MR. AREA’S CONNECTION
by Jenny Perrin

SUBJECT:
Geometry

TOPIC:
Areas of Polygons


Jenny Perrin
To obtain a downloadable copy of the worksheet that accompanies this bulletin board, click on the button below.

TITLE: Mr. Area’s Connection

SUBJECT: Geometry

TOPIC: Finding the area of triangles, squares, and various other polygons

INTERACTIVITY: Students will, as directed by their worksheet, create shapes on the bulletin board by removing points and putting up segments and diagonals. Once they have completed this activity, they are asked to take the segments and diagonals down, replacing them with the original point. They are given a diagram of points in case they cannot recall where each point lies.

DIRECTIONS FOR USE:

  1. On the worksheet: For each problem below, diagram the shape on the bulletin board using the segments and diagonals that are provided in the pockets. Then, sketch the shape, name each vertex using the original names of the points and find the lengths of each side, showing all work. Once you have found the lengths, find the area using the formulas you have been using in class. Show your work and circle your answers.
  2. On the bulletin board:

The Problem: Mr. Area just moved into a farmhouse and is trying to decide where each of his belongings will fit. On the worksheet provided below on the left, he has given the shapes and some of the dimensions of the objects. Your job is to find the area of each shape and any missing lengths.

Parts: There are segments, diagonals and points. (The points are on the board already.)

What you will need: one worksheet, a scrap piece of paper, pencil, and thinking cap

Directions: Take a worksheet from the folder below and follow the directions provided.

Construction: To connect two points with a segment:

  1. Take off the given points (and any in-between that you need to connect) and put them in the pocket below where it says points.
  2. Then, as the worksheet directions tell you, take out a segment or diagonal and connect the two (or more) points.
  3. Continue step 2 until you have finished constructing the shape.
  4. An example of two points connected by a segment is shown below.

***Important***When you are finished with the activity, put all points back in their original location. If you cannot remember where they go, a diagram is provided below.

A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
B1
B2
B3
B4
B5
C1
C2
C3
C4
C5
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
E1
E2
E3
E4
E5

TIME: If the opportunity to make a new shape is taken advantage of, the activity will take approximately 10 minutes to "draw" the figures and record the necessary information, and then another 30 minutes to complete the calculations. This would make it approximately 40 minutes.

SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION: Magnets were used as the main source of attachment for the interactive portion. Also, they helped to create a somewhat 3-dimensional look. There are magnets on top of the large points, which are covered up by a smaller set of points, which have magnets on their back. One-half by four inch strips of paper act as segments. On each end, there are magnets. Likewise, the diagonals also contain magnets on each end.

CREDIT: The student will receive two extra credit points for completing the activities and an additional point for making a shape of their own and finding the area for it. Thus, it is worth a maximum of three extra-credit points.

OTHER COMMENTS: The columns and rows are color-coded. The rows have small points of the same color while each column is only one color. By doing this, the colors add a bit of personality while maintaining structure.

Jenny Perrin
11/17/04